Facts & findings

International reports on the ecological,environmental and business effects of seaweed harvesting.

In our journey through the mass of reports and papers on seaweed and seaweed harvesting there are several reports that stand out.

These reports are vital because they are not scientific journals,they are not produced from any point of view other than that of seaweed harvesting as an industry and business.

In other words if you want to become involved in harvesting seaweed commercially these are the papers to read as they are from impeccable sources and are not in any way partisan other than to provide information for the industry

The three reports in this article are produced by the Irish department of the environment, the Northern irish heritage service and the Scottish governments respectively.

We have reported on these articles before but seperately.

They all say the same thing ultimately – commercial mechanised seaweed harvesting is not sustainable.

 

The Northern irish report (ref uk)

seaweedharvestingniehspositionstatement

Front page

Snip from above document ref mechanical harvesting

Mechanical harvesting unsustainable

 

The Irish govenment report

kelp-harvest-impacts-summary

from above report – signatures

international contributors

contributors

biased reports

 

The Scottish government report.  

00510620

 

Front page

 

consequences of large scale harvesting

Details of consequences

sustainable commercial harvesting Norway and Chile

 

These 3 reports clearly state that Mechanical commercial seaweed harvesting is not sustainable – though the last snip says that it is sustainable in Chile and Norway but not anywhere else – could this be because those governments could not be seen as allowing anything to occour in their territory which is not sustainable.

The chilean coast is suffering from massive environmental problems – the Norwegian coast is undergoing massive changes to the ecology, large areas are now closed to fisheries – both countries have largely uncontrolled industrial fish farming –